Pi Day 2016

We all can agree that Pi Day is the best holiday ever. It combines nerdiery and dessert and can be celebrated in the simplest possible way. I've documented 7 previous instances on this here blog (see archive) of me celebrating in one way or another (creating a crossword, getting a [different (and much better)] crossword published, testing my pi memory, and, of course, baking pies). The only 2 Pi Days I've missed posting on since the blog began were when I was travelling (Japan and Belize/Guatemala). So I can hardly let this Pi Day pass by.

This year, we didn't do anything too special, just baked a couple of pies: quiche for breakfast and an apple/rhubarb pie for dessert. The carved apple "π DAY" was a nice touch. But just because we didn't go all out celebrating doesn't mean we didn't appreciate the holiday in all its glory. 3.14 cheers for Pi Day!
Monday March 14 2016File under: holidays, food

Toggle Comments (1)comment?

Green Tree Gum

Longtime BdW friend and once Brothers Root blogger Andrew is involved in some pretty exciting stuff I wanted to share about. He and his buddy have started a natural gum company called Green Tree Gum Co. The gum is made without the sketchy ingredients in standard gum (sorbitol, butylated hydroxytoluene, baby seal tears, etc.), instead using all natural ingredients to achieve a cleaner, simpler chew.

And while the existence of such a product is exciting in its own right, what has really been interesting for me has been being privy to the process of starting a business and a product from the ground up. From packaging, distribution, branding, website, and everything else, hearing about what it takes to get an endeavor like this going is just plan neat.

What's that? You're sold. Now you just want to go buy some for yourself? Well far be it from me to stop you. Head on over to their online shop and get yourself some. Or, if you are in the Portland area, find some at your local retailer.

If you're looking to support this awesome endeavor more, you might even head on over to their facebook page and like them. But go buy some gum first. Tell him BdW sent you.
Saturday January 24 2015File under: misc, food

Toggle Comments (1)comment?

Pi Day 2014

It's that time again--the happiest of holidays, a day that combines two of the world's greatest things (math and dessert). It's Pi Day! And I wish you all the best pie and mathematical calculations ever.

As Pi Day Eve drew to a close yesterday, I was on the verge of resorting to my standard Pi Day fare: a pecan pie and quiche (posted here and here)*. But last minute inspiration brought forth this beauty, an apple pi pie. We think it turned out peachy. Della was responsible for the artistry while I did the culinary stuff. A little cocoa powder did the trick for coloring the pi dough.

Yay for Pi Day!
Friday March 14 2014File under: holidays, food

Toggle Comments (4)comment?

Food Preservation

The Northwest provides a bounty of wonderful food during the summer and fall. Come winter, I always say to myself, "Dang! I wish I would have put up some of those lovely berries or whatever.*" Well, with a little help and encouragement, this year, I'm doing it!

First up, cherries! Cherries, when in season, are ridiculously cheap and awesomely delicious. I'm currently babysitting Della's food dehydrator so I figured I'd give drying cherries a try. Success! It is amazing how small the amount of dried cherries one gets from a giant bag of fresh cherries. But dang they are good.

Up second, blueberry jam! This was an all out effort by Della and myself. We picked the berries, took a lesson from Ma in canning*, and ended up with a bunch of awesome jam! It's good too.

What's next? Maybe blackberry jam? Hopefully some dried plums. Perhaps some frozen sweet corn. Here's to the wonderful northwest bounty!
Monday July 30 2012File under: food

Toggle Comments (1)comment?

bebidas.saxtor.com

Blogs, as I've mentioned here before, are kind of a thing of the past*. People are into twitter and facebook now (which I consider blogging for the lazy man). So when a new blog comes around, I'm happy to give it props and encourage you all to check it out.

Saxtor, frequent commenter, one-time personal blogger, and hummus maker extraordinaire, has started a themed blog on bebidas ricas Mexicanas (or rich Mexican drinks to you no hablo espanol people). From it's about page:

This blog aims to collect in one place all of the delicious beverages that accompany Mexican cuisine. We are all familiar with tequila, and probably horchata and other agua frescas, but just as the world of Mexican food extends far beyond burritos and nachos, so does the world of Mexican beverages.

While many of the recipes/post cover alcoholic beverages, I picked a simple cucumber-lime agua fresca to try out for this post. Verdict? Simple and clear instructions, easy to make, and super yummy; perfect for those rare sunny days here in the NW.

Anyway, I highly suggest checking out bebidas.saxtor.com. Expand those horizons and viva las bebidas!
Wednesday May 9 2012File under: food, links

Toggle Comments (6)comment?

A Holiday For the Mathes - Pi Day 2012

Happy Pi Day!! For the (few) uninitiated of you, today is Pi Day because of the date (3/14). But since I've posted about it three times before, it is safe to assume you all are in the know.

The traditional celebration of Pi Day (besides annoying everyone you know by telling them it is Pi Day) is the baking of pies, of course. I pulled double pie duty this year with a pecan pie* and a quiche*. I guess that means I'm pulling double duty on eating too. C'est la vie.

(In looking back at previous Pi Day posts, I found it a rather amusing way to track self-portraits. Hopefully, come ultimate Pi Day (in either 2015 or 2016, depending on how you round the digits), I'll have a great little Pi Day photo album to reflect back on.)
Wednesday March 14 2012File under: holidays, food

Toggle Comments (4)comment?

Local Farms on the Road

My Chautauqua world heavily revolves around food: when and how to serve it, what food choices will piss the fewest people off*, how much money to spend on it, and where to buy it. Over my past 2.5 tours as kitchen manager, I've tried to incorporate local farms (usually organic) as the source for most of our produce. While the logistics of finding a farm, getting out there, and working with the sometimes limited veggies that are in season can be difficult (esp. with so much fun circus stuff happening that I would love to be a part of), the choice has been a rewarding one for me.

On this tour, I found my way out to at least 5 local farms (nearly one in each community) and walked the fields with the farmers seeing what was ready for harvest. Some farmers just heap the veggies on us, letting us just have past-their-prime veggies. After freshly cutting us kale, cabbage, zucchinis, and plenty of lettuce, Ed in Talkeetna couldn't stop himself. "I'm sure you could find a use for some rhubarb", he said*. And then, with our arms full and almost to the car he insisted we take a bunch of flowers too. When I came back for a second load of whatever he had a few days later, I left him with a couple of comp tickets to our [3+ hour] show.

For me, the health/taste/freshness argument for shopping at local farms doesn't resonate strongly, but knowing the people and story behind at least part of the food I serve does. And since Chautauqua is so much about enriching communities whether through service, performance, or education, participating in the local economy just makes sense.

(On a personal note: if I don't see kale, zucchini, or cabbage for the next 3 months, I won't be disappointed.)
Monday August 15 2011File under: circus, food

Toggle Comments (5)comment?

Salep

I've found my drink. For a long time, I've been searching for something to serve as my version of tea or coffee*, to warm me in the morning or for slow sipping after a meal. Here in Turkey, I've found the answer: Salep!

Wikipedia can do a better job explaining what exactly it is better than me, but the version I'm familiar with is essentially hot milk, sugar, cinnamon, and a special dash of whatever it is that makes it what it is (some flower, supposedly). Occasionally, it comes in a powder form that you just stir in water (which they sometimes serve on long distance buses).

But now my time in the cold weather is coming to an end (I hope). I'm progressing farther south and the the sun is progressing farther north*. The weather forecasts say that I have at least another day or two to enjoy a warm beverage without needing to find an air conditioned room to enjoy it in. If all goes to plan, that's plenty of time to have a few more good mugs* of salep.
Sunday April 3 2011File under: Turkey, food

Toggle Comments (5)comment?

Happy Pi Day 2011

Of all the things I shouldn't be doing right now, baking a pie is right up on the list. I should be packing and preparing to leave town for a couple months; laundry, bank, post office, charging batteries, downloading podcasts, cleaning, etc. But I just can't help it.

Today, you see, is Pi Day (previously covered here and here). It being one of my favorite holidays, I had to drop everything and make a pie. Now I have to drop everything and eat said pie. (Perhaps now you are starting to see why it is one of my favorite holidays).

I hope your Pi Day is 3.14 times as exciting as you hoped!
Monday March 14 2011File under: holidays, food

Toggle Comments (6)comment?

The Great Egg Off

Every time I get into a discussion regarding the keeping of chickens*, it inevitably comes up that "farm fresh eggs taste better". I love eggs and would eat them every morning if the fear of cholesterol wasn't instilled me at a very early age, but I've never really been able to notice a difference in taste. Recently, at my current housesitting gig in Portland, I was presented with a perfect opportunity to find out for sure. I call it the Great Egg Off.

The concept: three eggs (one from Ginger, one from Olive, and one from Trader Joe's), three tastings, a few observations along the way, and one final champion.

Observations:
GingerOliveTrader Joe's
• Hardest shell*
• Darkest, thickest yolk
• Quite small
• Super strong inner membrane on the shell
Least tasty
• Watery albumen
• Weird shape
• Weak, thin shell
• Biggest by far (although smallest yolk)
Second tastiest
• About what you'd expect from any store bought egg (not super yellow yolk, not super hard shell, not super big or small)
Tastiest

Surprisingly, the store bought egg wins the tastiness contest (although just barely edging out Olive)*. But that doesn't mean I'm sold on store bought eggs. The piece of mind of knowing that the eggs came from my own back yard, that I know what the chickens ate and how they were treated, is enough for me to choose farm fresh every time.

Sunday February 27 2011File under: food

Toggle Comments (5)comment?

   < Previous Page  Next Page >
 
1 2 3 4 5 6
Recent Comments:
*Wren on My First USA Today Crossword
*Jpeg on My First USA Today Crossword
*Jpeg on My First USA Today Crossword
*Wren on My First USA Today Crossword
*Jule on My First USA Today Crossword

Recent Content:
*Summer Performance Recap 2017
*My First USA Today Crossword
*Hamsters Dont Fight Fires
*Minor Media Mentions - Summer Juggling 2017
*Circus Camp
*Sleeping Around 2016-207
*Gypsies in the Palace
*MTVs Promposal
*Dude Camp 2017
*www.WrenAndDella.com
*ACPT 2017-Tournament and Talent Show
*2017 Valentines Day Act

Blogs du Friends:
*Baby Soren!
New pictures!
*Dullsound photos

*Gaigin, SMASH!
13. Toke, yo (aka really mature humor)
*HBAdventure


updated at 08:58 pm Oct 21st


Tags
Anacortes (39)
Cambodia (5)
China (14)
Korea (1)
Macau (1)
Mexico (13)
New Zealand (1)
Seattle (2)
Thailand (18)
USA (11)
Vietnam (5)
beard (5)
blog (8)
books (1)
coding (15)
comic (45)
contest (4)
environment (9)
events (12)
food (22)
games (15)
geocaching (4)
holidays (13)
juggling (8)
links (9)
meet-ups (1)
mexico (1)
misc (54)
movies (5)
open letter (2)
participation (1)
pics (39)
poetry (6)
poll (1)
quote (6)
road trip (25)
stats (1)
transportation (14)
travel (136)
video (6)
work (8)